Mobility Scooter

How to Choose the Right Mobility Scooter

Finding the right flexibility scooter could appear mind-boggling with the diverse styles and sizes, and brands there right now. A mobility scooter can be a motor vehicle that assists individuals who are freedom pushed be it from arthritis, muscle ailments, diabetic issues, or other conditions. Having an attached office chair the range of motion scooter can open whole new ways and doors that were in the past impossible to achieve. They are different from energy seats, or electrical wheelchairs, they are more appropriate to the open air and sometimes much less costly great post to read, many types of stuff available in the market for a brand new Mobility Scooter.

The first thing you must do is genuinely look at the excess weight needs which you require. They create types that assist more than 500 lbs, but it is essential to get a version that can satisfy your preferences, or you will have fear of damaging the freedom scooter and possibly voiding the guarantee on the freedom scooter. In addition, it places a tremendous force on the battery packs and drastically decreases battery lifespan when you are over the respected excess weight sessions from the scooter.

Usually 3-wheeled range of motion scooters give you a smaller transform radius, which makes it more appropriate to the indoors and transforming in close up quarters. Vacation scooters are flexibility scooters that are designed to be easily reassembled and dismantled, this may cause them great for holidays and most will easily fit into the trunk or car seat. Given that 3-wheeled scooters are usually small and think about below 4-wheeled scooters, a lot of traveling scooters only have 3-tires.

4-wheel mobility scooters have increased balance, weigh up help, and provide dramatically greater harmony than 3-tire mobility scooters. The reason being they uniformly disperse the load across the entrance and also the back again creating a significantly better center. Of course having a, normally, higher turn radius they are not at the same time designed for the in the house or indoor.

There are numerous additional safety measures on flexibility Mobility Scooter

Perhaps one of the most essential safety features located on numerous mobility scooters are the contra–suggestion wheels. Contra–tip wheels are fitted to the back in the mobility scooter and provide additional steadiness in case the freedom scooter actually starts to run backwards. Generally, the anti-idea wheels are made to not speak to the earth, apart from of course as soon as the office chair starts to hint in the opposite direction, such as if the driver tries to get around a control which is way too steep for that range of motion scooter. With this event, the anti-hint wheels will get in touch with the earth and ensure that the flexibility scooter does not tip above in reverse. Of course it is best never to take any dangers, so ensure you entirely browse the manual that accompanies your mobility scooter and you should not try to ascend curbs larger than those made as mention in handbook.

If you are purchasing a range of motion scooter to make it easier to get at home or to travel the farm, there is a design available which will meet your requirements. If you have questions whatsoever contact a reputable dealership and they will find a solution for all your inquiries and help you find the right mobility scooter that will provide many years of good quality service.

The Endangered Species

Men Live Sicker and Die Younger, yet They Shun Healthcare
The health gap between men and women widens every year. Men die sooner. Each of the 15 leading causes of death is more likely to kill them. Men have growing rates of psychological problems. Men are more likely to die as crime victims. Men shun doctors when they are sick and avoid checkups when they are well.
Are men going extinct? That’s the provocative question posed by the First World Congress on Men’s Health, being held this week in Vienna, Austria.

“Will men be needed at all?” wonders conference chairman Siegfried Meryn, MD, in the Nov. 3 issue of the British Medical Journal. “With the advent of sperm banks, in vitro fertilization, sex-sorting techniques, sperm-independent fertilization of eggs with somatic cells, human cloning, and same-sex marriage, it is reasonable to wonder about the future role of men in society.”

The problem doesn’t seem to be in men’s genes. When figures first started being kept in 1920, women only outlived men by one year. Ever since, women’s life expectancy has increased faster than that of men.

“The question is not why women live longer than men. It’s why did the increase in male life expectancy fail to keep pace with improvements in women’s life expectancy,” Emory University researcher Jean Bonhomme, MD, MPH, tells WebMD. Bonhomme is a board member of the nonprofit Men’s Health Network and president of the National Black Men’s Health Network.

The Endangered Species

The answer, Bonhomme suggests, is that men don’t get the same kinds of regular, preventive healthcare as women. They don’t get it partly because they don’t seek it.

“Since childhood, the sexes are taught to deal with physical pain differently,” Bonhomme says. “A boy who scrapes his knee is told to stop crying and be a man. But when that boy is 50 years old and having chest pain, he will say, ‘It’s just indigestion,’ because he’s been taught to minimize his pain. … A lot of men who don’t feel good don’t pay it any mind. When it comes to disease, early treatment is critical. Men miss out on this opportunity.”

A lot of this has to do with how men define themselves in Western culture.

“Part of what we consider manliness has a lot to do with being free and in charge of one’s own destiny — and there’s a certain stoicism,” historian and American culture expert John F. Kasson, PhD, tells WebMD. “Men are taught not to complain, to grin and bear it. That has implications for how men see healthcare.”

And yes, men’s famous unwillingness to grapple with their emotions plays a role.

“Often for both physical issues and emotional issues, men have trouble dealing with their emotions,” says Kasson, professor at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. “I don’t go along with all the men-are-from-Mars-women- are-from-Venus stuff, but it is true, by and large, that men find it difficult to get in touch with their own emotions and confide in others. There is this problem with admitting the need for help and seeking help — it isn’t seen as manly.”

Bonhomme says men are more likely than women to have jobs requiring dangerous and/or strenuous exertion. When this is the case, denying pain becomes a necessary part of earning a living — and it carries over into the rest of a man’s life. This helps explain why black men tend to have poorer health and shorter life expectancy than white men.

“Not only do men have more dangerous jobs than women, but African- American men have more dangerous jobs than white men,” Bonhomme notes. “To do some work, you have to detach from your pain. African-American men are over-represented in manual labor that necessitates indifference to pain. And for African-American men, there is also an element of distrust in the healthcare system.”

What can be done? Fear campaigns will backfire, Bonhomme predicts. It is not honorable for men to be afraid. Instead, the healthcare system has to become more relevant to men.

“Men want to be better men,” Bonhomme says. “We have to reverse the paradigm. Men see going to a doctor now to be admitting some kind of weakness or personal failure. Instead, they should see it as an ally of masculinity, something that can help you manage their independence, their vigor, and their functionality. And we need to stop shaming men and boys to always have to deny their pain.”

Being a Healthy Man

Being a Healthy Man

The Men At Risk™ has compiled the following information on Being a Health Man.

Being a healthy man isn’t just about dodging illness. It’s about thriving as much as you can, as long as you can, in every way you can. It’s about what goes on your plate, what your body does all day, what happens in your bedroom, and in your mind. Make this guide your launch pad for better health.

Fuel Your Body

Diet and Nutrition tips for Men
Lose the Gut!

Weight Loss for Men: Plan Your Day
High Protein Foods
Eating Out: How to Stick to Your Diet
Related Guide: Healthy Snack Food
Related Guide: Metabolism Boosters
Related Guide: High-Protein Diet for Weight Loss
Overcoming Overeating
Tool: How Weight Loss Diets Measure Up
Related Guide: Weight Loss Tips from Lance Armstrong’s Coach
Tool: BMI Calculator
Muscle Food

Muscle Food
Fitness

Get Started

Fat or Muscle
Related Guide: Benefits of Exercise
Related Guide: Hate Exercise?
Find a Gym: 10 Questions
Video: Personal Trainer: Know What to Look For
Message Board: Online Personal Trainer
Effects of Anabolic Steroids
Get Strong

Workout Tips
Strength Training
Exercises
Get Cut

Helpful tips to Obtain Muscle Definition
Sports Injuries

Sore Muscles
Related Guide: Weekend Warriors: Fight Back!
Related Web Site: Stretch Exercises
Video: Exercises for Stretching Hamstrings and Calves
Video: Stretching Exercises for the Hip and Groin
Sex & Intimacy

Power Sex

Male Sexual Problems
Men’s Guide to Great Sex
Blog: Sexual Responsiveness and Masturbation
Video: Sexercise
Message Board: Sex Question?
Message Board: Online Chat About Sex
Message Board: Online Gay Chat: Find Friends, Ask Questions
The Boys

Penis Enlargement Pills
Related Guide: Penis Implants
Blog: Boxers or Briefs?
Blog: Semen Production: How much is enough?
Blog: Vasectomy Reversals
Low Testosterone
Related Web Site: Testicle Loss
Blog: The Never-Ending Circumcision Debate
Blog: Adult Circumcision
Blog: Penis Enlargement
Message Board: Ask a Urologist
Message Board: Men’s Health Message Board
STD Info

HIV and AIDS Facts: The Basics
Related Guide: STD Symptoms
Related Guide: Condom Quiz
Related Guide: Chlamydia
Related Guide: Genital Warts/HPV
Related Guide: Gonorrhea
Genital Herpes Facts: The Basics
Related Guide: Syphilis
Relationships

Is Solo Sex Hurting Your Relationship?
Related Guide: 10 Secrets to a Better Love Life
Blog: Top 10 Reasons Women Don’t Want Sex
Related Guide: Overcoming Infidelity
Blog: Sexual Addiction: Real or Invented?
Related Guide: Virtual Sex: Threat to Real Intimacy?
Porn Addiction
Blog: Foreplay — Don’t Rush It
Blog: Pornography in Relationships
‘Down Low’: What Is It?
Bad Marriage May Make You Sick
Health Mindfields

Top Threats

Heart Disease
Heart Attack Symptoms
Lung Cancer
Related Guide: Colon Cancer
Prostate Cancer
Stroke
Smoking Cessation
Related Guide: Depression in Men
Below the Belt

Happy, Healthy, and Hard
Related Guide: Erectile Dysfunction
Enlarged Prostate
Prostatitis
Groin Hernia
Jock Itch
Blog: Blood in Semen
Blog: Blood in Urine
Message Board: Ask a Urologist
Message Board: Men’s Health
Medical Musts

Adult Immunizations
Video: Why Men Don’t Go to the Doctor
Related Guide: Medical Tests for Your 20s and 30s
Related Guide: Medical Tests for Your 40s
Related Guide: Medical Tests for Your 50s
Related Guide: Medical Tests for Your 60s and Up
Men’s Health: Tune-Up Schedule
Message Board: Alternative Health Message Board
Emotions & Family

Men’s Minds

Male Menopause
Related Web Site: Men’s Midlife Crisis
Related Web Site: Workplace Wellness
Related Guide: Sex and Depression
Workaholism
Addiction
Talk It Like a Man
Stressed Out

Stress Relief: Bouncing Back
Work Stress
Anger Management
Family

Family
Look Your Best

Skin

Razor Bumps
Related Guide: Shaving: Getting a Close Shave
Related Guide: Wrinkles and Men
Related Guide: Skin Cancer Prevention
Athlete’s Foot
Hair

Men’s Gray Hair
Related Guide: Causes of Hair Loss
Related Guide: Hair Loss Treatments
Style

How a Shoe Should Fit
Related Guide: How to Dress for Exercise
Related Guide: The Laws of American Style
Plastic Surgery

Plastic Surgery for Men
Related Guide: Breast Reduction for Men

Screenings for Men

Screenings for Men

Routine physical. A routine physical is an ideal opportunity for you to ask questions about your health and for your doctor to recommend ways to remain healthy. However, not everyone needs to see a doctor regularly, especially if you are young and healthy. Routine visits become more important and should occur more frequently after you reach age 50, when the rates of heart disease and cancer increase for most men.

Weight/Body Mass Index (BMI). Being overweight increases your risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and possibly some types of cancer. Use our BMI calculator to see if you are the right weight for your height. Ideally, your BMI should be between 19 and 24. A BMI of 25 to 29 is considered “overweight,” whereas a BMI of 30 or more is considered “obese.”

Blood pressure. High blood pressure increases your risk of heart disease and stroke. If your readings are higher than 140/90 milligrams of mercury, your doctor will probably recommend lifestyle changes — exercise and diet — and possibly medications to bring your blood pressure under better control.

Individuals who have readings at the high end of the “normal” range should have their blood pressure checked as often as every six to 12 months.

Cholesterol. High cholesterol also increases your risk of heart disease and stroke. If you have other risks for heart disease — such as high blood pressure or diabetes — your doctor may recommend checking your cholesterol as often as every one to two years. Others may need their cholesterol checked less often.

If your doctor plans to check your cholesterol, be sure to ask if you need to fast (not eat for six to eight hours) before your blood is drawn.

Diabetes. Diabetes is a common condition that greatly increases your risk of other medical problems, including heart disease, kidney failure, blindness and circulatory problems. Screening is the best way to detect diabetes, because many adults who develop diabetes will have few if any symptoms. Screening is particularly important for those at high risk of diabetes, including individuals who:

  • Are obese
  • Have a family history of diabetes
  • Are from certain ethnic groups, including African-Americans and Native Americans
  • Have high blood pressure or high cholesterol

Prostate Cancer Screening. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in men. However, screening for early stages of prostate cancer remains controversial. Men who are older than 50 and younger men with a family history of prostate cancer should discuss the risks and benefits of screening with their doctor. The best tests for prostate cancer include the digital rectal exam and prostate-specific antigen and a PSA Free screening.

Colon cancer screening. Colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in men. All men (and women) older than 50 should be screened regularly for colon cancer. Younger men with a family history of colon cancer should also be screened. Unfortunately, fewer than one-half of Americans at risk undergo regular screening.

There is some controversy about the best way to screen for colon cancer. Some doctors recommend that all individuals undergo colonoscopy, whereas other doctors feel that fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) or sigmoidoscopy (or a combination of the two) are a good alternative. Be sure to discuss these options with your doctor.

Immunizations. Immunizations are a simple and effective way to avoid important infections. In addition to those listed in the table, a number of other immunizations (such as hepatitis B, hepatitis A and Lyme disease) are available. Talk to your doctor about which immunizations are appropriate for you.

Other types of screening. Your doctor may also perform or recommend the following types of screening:

  • A complete skin check to find worrisome moles or early skin cancer
  • A testicular exam to screen for cancer of the testicles
  • An evaluation of the flow of blood in important arteries, such as the ones that carry blood to your brain or to your feet
  • A visit with the ophthalmologist or optometrist to screen for eye problems, such as glaucoma
  • Blood or urine tests to screen for sexually transmitted diseases, such as chlamydia or HIV, especially if you are at high risk
  • Screening for other infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis and hepatitis C, especially if you are at increased risk